Resources

PTSD victims of violent crime find positive self-growth facing trauma: study (The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti)

On dit ce qui ne te tue pas te rend plus fort. Est-il vrai? (programme de radio en anglais seulement)

Resilience is a hot topic. And while it suggests bounce or elasticity, resilience means something different for every victim of violence, says Benjamin Roebuck, professor and co-ordinator of  Algonquin’s graduate victimology program who is leading the study, which won a $207,000 grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

The research team includes representatives from a number of victims’ groups including Victim Justice Network, the Office of Victims of Crime, the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime, and Victims of Violence.

They say whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. But is it true?

Globe and Mail Article Reports on Innovative Research Project

Dans une nouvelle étude, un partenariat entre le Collège Algonquin et le Réseau de justice aux victimes, examine la résilience des victimes des crimes violents. L’étude demande aux participants comment ils ont géré le traumatisme et la tragédie, et comment ils ont trouvé l’appui et les forces personnelles. (L’article est disponible en anglais seulement).

A new study, launched in partnership with the Victim Justice Network, is trying to learn what makes victims of violent crime resilient. The study, conducted by researchers from Algonquin College and the University of Ottawa, is asking participants how they coped after trauma and tragedy, and how they found support and inner strength.

This newsletter, written in partnership with Elder Abuse Ontario and the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence, features highlights from Danielle Sutton and Myrna Dawson’s important research findings examining the killing of 452 older women (55 yrs. & older) in Ontario over a 38-year period (1974 to 2012). The newsletter includes commentary on select research findings, offer considerations for working with women who are older, and resources. 

Male childhood sexual victimization is a topic that a man may not feel comfortable discussing.  Whether it was a single occurrence or ongoing, being sexually victimized as a child may still affect how you live your life to this day, affecting how you feel and how you relate to those around you. You may have told the police, your family, your friends, or no one at all, but if you would like to speak then we would like to hear from you. In this new research project, by listening to your personal experiences, we aim to expand our knowledge of how victims of childhood sexual abuse could better be accommodated in the justice system, what type of supports were the most helpful to you, and what strengths you hold. 

The deadline to participate is April 21, 2017. 

Please complete the online survey at:
http://uottawa.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/mroebuck/resilience-and-victims-of-violence/

In partnership with VJN, researchers at Algonquin College have launched a survey to better understand the experiences of victims and survivors. The results will be used to improve training for professionals who help victims of violent crime. Click here to learn more about how you can participate.

 Are you a male who has experienced violent crime (including physical or sexual abuse during childhood, intimate partner abuse, sexual violence, or physical violence)? Would you like to share your story? A new research project aims to learn from your experience to improve services for victims and survivors of violence. Our work is focused on identifying your strengths, as well as the challenges you went through in your journey. 

The deadline to participate is April 21, 2017. 

Please complete the online survey at:
http://uottawa.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/mroebuck/resilience-and-victims-of-violence/

In partnership with VJN, researchers at Algonquin College have launched a survey to better understand the experiences of victims and survivors. The results will be used to improve training for professionals who help victims of violent crime. Click here to learn more about how you can participate.

Disclaimer: Welcome to our Find Help listing of services that provide help for victims of crime.  This listing represents only a subset of the many services and supports available to Canadians across Canada and we hope it is helpful for users of the Victim Justice Network site.  For a more comprehensive listing of services helping victims through all stages of their needs, we do encourage you to avail yourselves of your local 211 phone or online services or, alternatively, of your regional community services listings most of which are included in this site under Information and Referral.  The services listed on this site are based on the most recent information available on those services' individual websites in mid-2015.  We will endeavour to review these annually for accuracy and any changes or discontinuation of service.

Décharge: Voici notre liste des services Find Help visant à aider les victimes de crime. Cette liste ne représente qu’une partie des nombreux services et soutiens mis à la disposition des Canadiens dans tout le pays. Nous espérons qu’elle sera utile aux utilisateurs du site de Victim Justice Network. Si vous souhaitez en obtenir une plus complète, à quelque niveau des besoins des victimes que ce soit, n’hésitez pas à appeler votre numéro local 211 ou à utiliser des services en ligne ou encore les listes de services communautaires régionaux, services qui, pour la plupart, sont indiqués sur ce site sous la rubrique Information and Referral. Ces services ont été relevés dans les toutes dernières informations disponibles à la mi-2015 sur les sites pertinents. Nous nous efforcerons de les revoir chaque année pour qu’ils restent à jour.